Latinos For Texas Blog

2008-Feb-27

Austin: Urgent need for poll workers

Filed under: — site admin @ 6:10 pm
Here’s the deal, if we don’t get enough folks to work these precinct polling locations, THEY WILL HAVE TO BE COMBINED!! This will lead to much confusion, turning first-time voters off, and possible voter disenfranchisement for both the primary and caucus!If you are an Election Judge worried about missing your own caucus, you can hand off the post-poll closing paperwork delivery to an alternate judge or clerk.

If you can work basically 7am-7pm on election day, please read more below…


The Travis County Democratic Party contracts with the Travis County Elections Division for the Primary Election and are seeking Democrats to work the polling locations throughout the county for the March 4, 2008 Democratic Primary.Let’s not have this happen, so spread the word and tell all your friends and family who may be able to work the polls to call 854 - 9552 and tell them to say: “I want to work the polls for the Democratic Party on March 4th!!!”

We need presiding judges (aka Election Judges or Poll workers), alternate judges, and clerks. All poll workers are required to attend training which is provided by the Travis County Elections Division before the Primary and will be offered during the day and evening, during the week and on weekends. The pay, which is set by the Texas Secretary of State, is $7.00/hour.

If you are interested in working the polls on March 4, 2008 Election Day please call the TRAVIS COUNTY ELECTIONS DIVISION at 854-9552.

2008-Feb-22

Well, what did you think of that debate?

Filed under: — site admin @ 12:03 am

Senators Obama and Clinton put on quite a show: Rich in details but still rhetorical from both camps, a few zingers here and there, and a very interesting closing from Sen. Clinton. Texas matters in a big way. Hispanics in a big way.

What stuck with you, what made you think? Let us know in the comments. 

2008-Feb-13

Rest in peace, raulsalinas

Filed under: — SoniaS @ 3:42 pm

Very sad news today
——————–

Raul Salinas, known as raulsalinas, that great human being, transformed by life and fire, has died. Raul was a featured poet at the Border Book Festival in 2000. It was a memorable performance as Raul danced, sang and gyrated through the power of his words his English, Spanish and Xicanindio.

His life was hard, yes, as he was incarcerated for many years in U.S. prisons, but those who knew and loved him saw his transformation into a light indescribable–beatific, really. We celebrate his great beauty and his gifts of spirit and words.

Raul has made his way to the Ancestors.

Raul will be greatly missed. His work, poetry, and philosophy will live on in the good works of poets, artists, musicians and cultural centros throughout America. His spirit we lead us all and help us to survive and thrive in difficult times.

His words/poems should serve as maps for us all in our quest to keep culture, heritage and tradition alive in our barrios, cul de sacs, suburbs,ranchos…wherever you/we live.

Thank you, Raul. You have blessed us all.
Manuel Diosdado Castillo, Jr.
San Anto Cultural Arts

A BIO OF RAUL SALINAS

Raul Roy Tapona Salinas was born in San Antonio, Texas on March 17, 1934. He was raised in Austin, Texas from 1936 to 1956, when he moved to Los Angeles. In 1957 he was sentenced to prison in Soleded State Prison in California. Over the span of the next 15 years, Salinas spent 11 years behind the walls of state and federal penitentiaries.
It was during his incarceration in some of the nation’s most brutal prison systems, that Salinas social and political consciousness were intensified, and so it is with keen insight into the subhuman conditions of prisons and an inhuman world that the pinto aesthetics that inform his poetry were formulated.

His prison years were prolific ones, including creative, political, and legal writings, as well as an abundance of correspondence. In 1963, while in Huntsville, he began writing a jazz column entitled THE QUARTER NOTE which ran consistently for 1-1/2 years. In Leavenworth he played a key role in founding and producing two important prison journals, Aztlán de Leavenworth and New Era Prison Magazine, through which his poetry first circulated and gained recognition within and outside of the walls. As a
spokesperson, ideologue, educator, and jailhouse lawyer of the Prisoner Rights Movement, Salinas also became an internationalist who saw the necessity of making alliances with others. This vision continues to inform his political and poetic practice. Initially published in the inaugural issue of Aztlán de Leavernworth, a Trip through a
Mind Jail (1970) became the title piece for a book of poetry published by Editorial Pocho-Che in 1980.

With the assistance of several professors and students at the University of Washington - Seattle, Salinas gained early release from Marion Federal Penitentiary in 1972. As a student at the University of Washington, Salinas was involved with community empowerment projects and began making alliances with Native American groups in the Northwest, a relationship that was to intensify over the next 15 years. Although Salinas writes of his experiences as a participant in the Native American Movement, it is a dimension of his life that has received scant attention. In the 22 years since his release from Marion, Salinas involvement with various political movements has earned him an international reputation as an eloquent spokesperson for justice. Along the way he has continued to refine and produce his unique blend of poetry and politics.

Salinas’ literary reputation in Austin earned him recognition as the poet laureate of the East Side and the title of *maestro* from emerging poets who seek his advice and a mentor. While his literary work is probably most widely known for his street aesthetics and sensibility, which document the interactions, hardships, and intra- and intercultural strife of barrio life and prison in vernacular, bilingual language, few people have examined the influence of Jazz in his obra that make him part of the Beat Generation of poets, musicians, and songwriters. His poetry collections included dedications, references, and responses to Alan Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Charles Bukowski, Charlie Parker, Herschel Evans, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis, for example. Academics have primarily classified Salinas as an important formative poet of the Chicano Movement; yet, while he may have received initial wide-scale recognition during the era, it would be unfair Raul Salinas, known as raulsalinas, that great human being, transformed by life and fire, has died. Raul was a featured poet at the Border Book Festival in 2000. It was a memorable performance as Raul danced, sang and gyrated through the power of his words his English, Spanish and Xicanindio.

His life was hard, yes, as he was incarcerated for many years in U.S. prisons, but those who knew and loved him saw his transformation into a light indescribable–beatific, really. We celebrate his great beauty and his gifts of spirit and words.

Raul has made his way to the Ancestors.

Raul will be greatly missed. His work, poetry, and philosophy will live on in the good works of poets, artists, musicians and cultural centros throughout America. His spirit we lead us all and help us to survive and thrive in difficult times.

His words/poems should serve as maps for us all in our quest to keep culture, heritage and tradition alive in our barrios, cul de sacs, suburbs, ranchos…wherever you/we live.

Thank you, Raul. You have blessed us all.

Manuel Diosdado Castillo, Jr.
San Anto Cultural Arts

En paz descanse. May he rest in peace.

2008-Feb-3

Voter Reg Drive - Austin, All Day, All Over Town

VOTER REG DRIVE
Be a part of the annual Last-Day-to-Register Marathon!
Feb 04, 2008 8am-midnight at Fiesta (38th and I-35)
ANY AMOUNT OF TIME YOU CAN GIVE WILL HELP!

If you want to register voters on Monday, you can get deputized by Glen Maxey who will be at the Riverside Grocery (just east of IH 35, Riverside at Parker). Stop by there first, if you are not already a Deputy Registrar, then stop by any of the locations listed below!

LFT is coordinating the Fiesta location at 38th and I-35, but wherever you can help for as long as you can help will make a difference.

Remember, Monday, Feb 04, is the deadline if you want to vote in the Presidential primaries! Shifts are in four hour blocks, but if you can only come for part of it, thats okay, too. Simply sign up in the shift that is closest, then email to let us know your details.

We do this every year for the last few years, and people always say they like it, even though it is a fair amount of work, it is good work. Also, don’t worry if a few people are already signed up, we can always use a few extra hands.

Spanish speakers especially encouraged to volunteer, but not at all required!

8am-noon
8 am - FIESTA MART - VOTER REGISTRATION MARATHON

12-4pm
12 noon - FIESTA MART - VOTER REGISTRATION MARATHON

4pm-8pm
4 pm -FIESTA MART - VOTER REGISTRATION MARATHON

8pm-midnight
8 pm - FIESTA MART - VOTER REGISTRATION MARATHON

Other Locations:
University Co-Op on the Drag @ 2246 Guadalupe
Wheatsville Coop @ 3101 Guadalupe
Goodwill @ 2800 S Lamar
Whole Foods Market @ 6th at Lamar
Fiesta Mart @ IH 35 and 38th
Guero’s @ 1412 S. Congress
Riverside Grocery (Parker & East Riverside) @ 1727 E Riverside Dr
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts @ 701 E Stasney Dr
MT Supermarket - Chinatown Center @ 10901 N. Lamar Blvd.

Email Ryan Giggs, anytime, at info@registertravis.com for details and assignments.

Thanks for being involved,
LFT Steering Committee
(Crystal, Lila, Mario, Michael, Richard and Sabas)

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